Levontie Kundozerov, 19001938 (aged 37 years)

Name
Levontie /Kundozerov/
Surname
Kundozerov
Given names
Levontie
Birth July 18, 1900 40
Birth of a sisterOkahvie Kundozerov
January 2, 1905 (aged 4 years)
Birth of a brotherLazarus Kundozerov
April 14, 1907 (aged 6 years)
Note: Recorded here is the date in the Archives. This differs from the date known in Finland (20th Mar 1906) which he gave when he entered Finland. Also, the Archive date is in the old Russian calendar.
Birth of a half-sisterHekla Kundozerov
June 17, 1909 (aged 8 years)
Birth of a brotherVasilei Kundozerov
February 11, 1912 (aged 11 years)
Death of a fatherMehvo Kundozerov
January 10, 1922 (aged 21 years)
Cause: Shot by Bolsheviks
Birth of a sonAnti Kundozerov
1927 (aged 26 years)

Birth of a daughterOlga Kundozerov
1928 (aged 27 years)

Birth of a daughterKseniya Kundozerov
1931 (aged 30 years)

Birth of a sonIvan Kundozerov
1935 (aged 34 years)

Birth of a daughterAino Kundozerov
June 22, 1936 (aged 35 years)

Death 1938 (aged 37 years)

Family with parents
father
18601922
Birth: 1860IK Kuntijoki
Death: January 10, 1922IK Ruva
mother
Marriage MarriageApril 15, 1898
elder sister
2 years
himself
5 years
younger sister
2 years
younger brother
pkunl190701.jpg
19071988
Birth: April 14, 1907 47IK Soukelo
Death: February 19, 1988Finland Helsinki
5 years
younger brother
Father’s family with Annikki
father
18601922
Birth: 1860IK Kuntijoki
Death: January 10, 1922IK Ruva
step-mother
half-sister
half-sister
Family with Stephenie
himself
partner
son
2 years
daughter
4 years
daughter
5 years
son
18 months
daughter
child
Private
Note

The following name was taken from a list of victims, as described below:

Kundozerov Leonti Mefodjevitš s.1902 Sokolozero (Soukelo) Kiestingin piiri karjalainen metsänkaataja Sokolozero ammuttu 10.02.1938 .

In August 1937, the NKVD ordered prison camp wardens to submit lists of prisoners they thought were still conducting anti-state agitation. Tens of thousands of names were processed by the secret police and a three-man panel, called the Osobaya Troika or "special three," signed the death sentences and dispatched them back to thousands of Gulags across Soviet Russia. The warrants ordered the executions of 4,500 slave laborers from the White Sea canal, 1,116 inmates of the Solovetskiye camps, and nearly 3,500 other Karelian political prisoners. The victims were lawyers, school teachers, scholars, professors, ethnic minorities, religious leaders, university students, and common workers.

A list of the names, biographical data, and dates of execution of 141 Finnish Americans executed and buried in a secret KGB mass grave at Sandarmokh in the Karelian Republic of the Russian Federation. Fourteen victims were American citizens by birth. It is unknown how many of the others, who immigrated to the United States early in the twentieth century, were naturalized American citizens at the time of their move from the United States to the Soviet Union in the early 1930s.

The list of victims is based on the late Mayme Sevander’s research in archives in Petrozavodsk, Russia. This victims of Karelia list was translated into English by Jukka Pietilainen and Carl Ross from a similar list found in the the Finnish language journal Carelia (issues 2-9, 1998) published in Petrozavodsk.

The names in KGB archives are in Russian and follow Russian naming conventions which include patronymics. The latter, however, were not customary among North American Finns. To preserve the authenticity of KGB documents the Russian patronymics have been preserved, while the Finnish/English spelling is given in parentheses. Russian patronymics have double markers: OVA/EVA, indicating the possessive case; and ICH/vitš -- masculine, NA -- feminine. Thus, Ivanovich -- son of Ivan; Ivanovna -- daughter of Ivan.

In addition to KGB and other archival records, Sevander made use of Yuri Dmitriev, Mesto Rasstrela Sandarmokh [Sandarmokh Is Where They Were Executed] (Petrozavodsk [Russia], 1999); Eila Lahti-Argutina, Olimme Joukko Vieras Vaan [We Were Just a Bunch of Strangers] (Turku [Finland]: Siirtolaisuusinstituutti, 2001); and Mayme Sevander, Vaeltajat [Wanderers].

Victims of Karelia List (All Nationalities)