Ruth Peterson, 1915

Name
Ruth /Peterson/
Given names
Ruth
Surname
Peterson
Birth 1915 51 41

Census January 1, 1920 (aged 5 years)

Death of a fatherJeremias Rodionoff
1920 (aged 5 years)

Census April 1, 1930 (aged 15 years)

Death of a sisterAdelle Peterson
1934 (aged 19 years)
Death of a motherIda Hyypio
1954 (aged 39 years)
Death of a brotherOscar Peterson
1967 (aged 52 years)
Death of a brotherNiels Peterson
1967 (aged 52 years)
Death of a sisterLillian Peterson
April 2, 1988 (aged 73 years)
Death of a sisterNelma Peterson
December 26, 1989 (aged 74 years)
Death of a brotherAxel Peterson
March 24, 1990 (aged 75 years)
Death of a husbandHarold Lahti
May 31, 1992 (aged 77 years) Age: 82
Cause: Hodgekin's disease
Title
Biography of Jeremias Rodionoff

Text:

Written by Ruth Peterson, Jeremias' youngest child, many years after his death. Contains an early account of life in the old country and it's spur to emigrating.

Quality of data: secondary evidence
Family with parents
father
mother
Religious marriage Religious marriageNovember 23, 1889Calumet
2 years
elder brother
18911967
Birth: 1891 27 17USA
Death: 1967USA
3 years
elder brother
2 years
elder sister
from Nelma's funeral
18951989
Birth: March 5, 1895 31 21
Death: December 26, 198949912 Bruce Crossing, Ontonagon, Michigan
3 years
elder sister
4 years
elder sister
6 years
elder brother
19051967
Birth: 1905 41 31USA
Death: 1967USA
1 year
elder sister
3 years
elder sister
19071934
Birth: 1907 43 33USA
Death: 1934USA
3 years
elder brother
19101990
Birth: March 10, 1910 46 36USA
Death: March 24, 1990Hamcock, Houghton, Michigan, USA
3 years
elder sister
19131988
Birth: January 23, 1913 49 39USA
Death: April 2, 1988Contra Costa, Florida, USA
3 years
herself
Family with Harold Lahti
husband
Wedding photo
19101992
Birth: January 25, 1910Mohawk
Death: May 31, 1992Houghton County Medical Care Facility, Hancock, Michigan
herself
son
Private
daughter
Private
CensusCensus 1920 Portage, Houghton, Michigan Jeremiah's family
CensusCensus 1930 Portage, Houghton, Mighigan Jeremiah's family
TitleBiography of Jeremiah Peterson
Text:

Written by Ruth Peterson, Jeremias' youngest child, many years after his death. Contains an early account of life in the old country and it's spur to emigrating.

Quality of data: secondary evidence
NoteBiography of Jeremiah Peterson
Quality of data: secondary evidence
Note

Ruth wrote an interesting biography of her father, Jeremiah, and it is included in the source (S17).

It includes several pages of details of his descendants.

Note

Published 2th Feb 1992 The Daily Mining Gazette:

Couple shares 'other side of the story Health problems lead to separation

By Cynthia Beaudette

"The summer of 1987," Ruth began, describing her husband's struggle with lymphoma. "We were told then that he had six months to live." Ruth said she didn't expect Harold to get well, but "I wanted to do everything I could to make him as comfortable as possible." HOUGHTON -- It all began with a letter from Houghton resident Ruth Lahti. Ruth told me she appreciated a story I had written about her husband, Harold, a current resident at the Houghton County Medical Care Facility, and asked if I would be interested in hearing "the other side of the story." "That side is the person like me, who lives alone and is un-able to care for a mate with health problems," she wrote. ''Arranging for my husband's care at a nursing facility was a very difficult decision to make." I called Ruth and we met later that week. Ruth lives alone in the cozy one-bedroom apartment she once shared with Harold, her husband of 50 years. She is an attractive and vital woman, but her radiant face hides the pain she endures from the physical condition that made it impossible to give her husband the care he needs. "Harold became sick in the After initial surgery, Harold began a series of chemotherapy treatments that lasted five months. "The chemo made him so ill," recalls Ruth. "I really think he should have been in a hospital. But after each treatment I brought him home and took care of him. At one point he was down to 103 pounds and I didn't think he would live." Harold's doctor later remarked that Ruth had provided her husband with such good care "that he refused to die." When the oncologist said Harold had beaten the cancer, "I couldn't believe it," says Ruth. But this was only the beginning of the battle. The treatments had crippled Harold's spine, making it difficult for him to manage without a great deal of help. Ruth's own spine was starting to succumb to the effects of arthritis and she came to the conclusion that her husband would receive better care in a nursing facility. Ruth says the money Harold receives from Social Security goes further at a skilled care facility and "he gets better health care there." Ruth herself is eligible for more government sponsored health care benefits now that she lives on her own. Both Harold and Ruth were employees of Houghton County for a number of years. Harold worked as a machinist for the Houghton County Road Commission and Ruth was a nurse's aide for the Houghton County Hospital. Ruth says she likes to think that now the county is giving them something back. Today, Ruth spends her time baking (she gave me a delicious loaf of her bread to take to my children), and visiting Harold when she can. After 57 years she has given up driving, but "the bus service is good and some-times friends take me to see Harold. On weekends I go by taxi." Still Harold gets lonely: "Ruthie, I'd like to be home with you," comes the voice from the other end of the receiver. "I tell him I'd like to have him here, but I remind him of all the reasons things have to be this way," says Ruth. "He admits it's true, but still it's hard for him to accept." As for her future, Ruth remarks, "It isn't going to be easy, but when there's an opening, I'll go to a nursing home myself." She says the waiting list for such an opening is long and she wants to be prepared. After our conversation I decided to look into the health care needs of our county's elderly and I was overwhelmed by the response. I spent two weeks talking with everyone from hospital administrators to home health care nurses. And I learned about their side of the story too. What impressed me most was the commitment, empathy and enthusiasm these individuals expressed regarding the people they care for. Remarks like, "It breaks my heart," and "I feel very deeply for these people," punctuated our conversations. As one administrator says, "There are no easy answers." Still I hope area seniors and their families will gain hope in knowing that so many people care enough to look after them.